Anger Management Classes Birmingham AL

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Anise Jackson
(205) 286-8934
Life Solutions Consultants1600 20th Street South
Birmingham, AL
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Sex Therapy, Anger Management
Qualification
School: Graduate School - UAB
Year of Graduation: 2005
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Female
Age: Adults
Average Cost
$70 - $90
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: No

Oasis Counseling For Women And Children
(205) 933-0338
1900 14th Ave S
Birmingham, AL
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided By:
Uab Mental Health Services
(205) 934-7008
1801 University Blvd
Birmingham, AL
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided By:
Brandi Bonner Cooke
(205) 933-8101
700 19th St S
Birmingham, AL
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Crystal Schrum Dillard
(205) 939-9193
Children''s Behav Hlth/Hlth Sys
Birmingham, AL
Ages Served
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Infants (0-2 yrs.)
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Alabama - Tuscaloosa
Credentialed Since: 2008-11-13

Data Provided By:
Ronald E Douglas
(205) 610-8140
Douglas Counseling Services, LLC
Birmingham, AL
Specialties
Anger Management, Behavioral Issues, Parenting
Qualification
School: University of Alabama at Birmingham
Year of Graduation: 2007
Years In Practice: 2 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults
Average Cost
$70 - $90
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: No

Roy C. Martin
(205) 934-2334
U-AL Birmingham, Dept of Neurology
Birmingham, AL
Services
Clinical Neuropsychological Assessment, Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder, Psychological Assessment
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Louisiana State University
Credentialed Since: 1996-10-07

Data Provided By:
Susan D Isbill
(205) 933-8101
Birmingham VA Med Cntr
Birmingham, AL
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Psychological Assessment, Disorder Diagnosed in Infancy-Adolescence (e.g., ADHD, LD, MR, or Pervasive Devel Disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Brigham Young University
Credentialed Since: 1997-03-03

Data Provided By:
Patience Hodges Claybon
(205) 933-6151
1716 14th Ave S
Birmingham, AL
Specialty
Psychiatry, Addiction Medicine

Data Provided By:
Lifesource
(205) 326-1513
1037 22nd St S
Birmingham, AL
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Anger Management

Topics - Anger
Written by Lynette J. Hoy, NCC, LCPC   

When I get angry, I blow up so fast that I don't have time to stop and think or ask for God's wisdom. I know all of these things would help, but by the time I think of it I've already done the damage. What can I do to help get control of my temper?

Dear Friend; It seems to me that anger results from a combination of sources: low self-worth, recurring patterns, disappointments, revenge, spiritual warfare, depression , sin and/or selfishness, inability to communicate assertively, too much stress and other emotional or relationship problems. Anger immediately rears It's ugly head within 1-3 seconds of a provoking incident. You need to learn how to prevent such an overpowering emotional response & how to respond in healthy ways to the triggering events. Some people hold their anger inside and then, blow-up later on at a small trigger. I recommend taking the following steps:

  1. Write out and log recent times of anger. Explore what happened, what the issue was, how you felt and what resulted. Then think of some times in the past when you were able to control your anger... probably at work... how did you control it? What did you do or say? What did you tell yourself to calm down? Most people tend to be able to control their anger at times. thus proving that they can have control over it. Order the book and take the Anger Survey in the first chapter.
  2. Learn to take time-outs immediately. You can walk away from situations/people who trigger your anger. Give yourself time to cool off: 10-20 min. Take a run, pray and think about what it is that you are really upset about. What is the real issue and what are the feelings underlying your anger? What do you want to request from the person? How can you negotiate or compromise some conflict you are having?
  3. Avoid lots of caffeine. Completely avoid alcohol and drugs, unless you are taking a prescription. Caffeine increases the metabolism, heart rate and blood pressure, and causes mood irritability. Alcohol and drugs may give a person a "high" or mellow feeling at first and will seem to relieve stress but the effects are temporary and soon after you will actually feel more irritable, and depressed and angry feelings will not only return but usually escalate.
  4. You may be dealing with a lot of stress or loss. This needs to be explored and worked through possibly with the help of a counselor. Explore how you can decrease stress in your life. Begin an exercise program so that you can work off some of the stress in your life physically.
  5. Learning to communicate assertively is one of the most important tools for expressing your anger in a healthy way. See book suggestions below. Begin to share more openly & lovingly your needs, requests and opinions with others. Start setting boundaries so that you are not taking on other people's responsibilities. Order the Assert Yourself! audiotape and workbook!
  6. Depres...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Mental Health Matters