Child Psychiatrists State College PA

Child psychiatrists diagnose and treat a range of conditions in children. They treat developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, learning disorders, psychotic disorders such as childhood onset schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and eating disorders in children. Read on to learn more and to find child psychiatrists in State College, PA who specialize in child and adolescent psychiatry.

Mukundam Veerabathini, MD
(814) 334-5226
1305 Megan Dr
State College, PA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Osmania Med Coll, Univ Hlth Sci, Vijayawada, Hyderabad, Ap, India
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided By:
Craig Sherman Feaster, MD
(814) 867-8490
110 Radnor Rd
State College, PA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Pa State Univ Coll Of Med, Hershey Pa 17033
Graduation Year: 1996
Hospital
Hospital: Centre Comm Hosp, State College, Pa

Data Provided By:
Cyril M James Puhalla, MD
(570) 825-6425
132 The Meadows Dr
Centre Hall, PA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided By:
Kenneth William Hylbert
(814) 867-0670
320 Rolling Ridge Dr
State College, PA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Elaine A. Rodino
(814) 234-3464 ext. 12
141 E. Fairmount Avenue
State College, PA
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Gender Issues (MenÆs/WomenÆs Issues), Couples Psychotherapy
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Languages Spoken
Italian
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Alliant International University - Los Angeles
Credentialed Since: 1981-05-07

Data Provided By:
John Iverson Boswell III, MD
814-364-2161 x204
1287 Penfield Rd
State College, PA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided By:
Nitin Vasantrai Sheth, MD
(570) 829-7900
140 Roundhill Rd
Boalsburg, PA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Grant Med Coll, Univ Of Bombay, Bombay, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
Frank Joseph Hamlett, MD
132 The Meadows Dr
Centre Hall, PA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Pa State Univ Coll Of Med, Hershey Pa 17033
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Wendy J. Moran
814-238-1880 ext 6
229 W Foster Ave
State College, PA
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Couples Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Pennsylvania State University
Credentialed Since: 1998-02-09

Data Provided By:
Craig Sherman Feaster
(814) 867-0670
320 Rolling Ridge Dr
State College, PA
Specialty
Child Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

ADHD: How Is ADHD Identified and Diagnosed?

Disorders - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Written by iSyke .   
Article Index
ADHD: How Is ADHD Identified and Diagnosed?
Steps In Making a Diagnosis
All Pages

Many parents see signs of an attention deficit in toddlers long before the child enters school. For example, as a 3-year-old, Henry's son already displayed some signs of hyperactivity. He seemed to lose interest and dart off even during his favorite TV shows or while playing games. Once, during a game of "catch," he left the game before the ball even reached him!

Like Henry's son, a child may be unable to focus long enough to play a simple game. Or, like Mark, the child may be tearing around out of control. But because children mature at different rates, and are very different in personality, temperament, and energy level, it's useful to get an expert's opinion of whether the behaviors are appropriate for the child's age. Parents can ask their pediatrician, or a child psychologist or psychiatrist to assess whether their toddler has an attention disorder or is just immature, has hyperactivity or is just exuberant.

Seeing a child as "a chip off the old block" or "just like his dad" can blind parents to the need for help. Parents may find it hard to see their child's behavior as a problem when it so closely resembles their own. In fact, like Henry, many parents first recognize their own disorder only when their children are diagnosed.

In many cases, the teacher is the first to recognize that a child is hyperactive or inattentive and may consult with the school psychologist. Because teachers work with many children, they come to know how "average" children behave in learning situations that require attention and self control. However, teachers sometimes fail to notice the needs of children like Lisa who are quiet and cooperative.

Types of Professionals Who Make the Diagnosis

School-age and preschool children are often evaluated by a school psychologist or a team made up of the school psychologist and other specialists. But if the school doesn't believe the student has a problem, or if the family wants another opinion, a family may need to see a specialist in private practice. In such cases, who can the family turn to? What kinds of specialists do they need?

 

Speciality
Can diagnose ADHDCan prescribe medications, if neededProvides counseling or training
Psychiatrists
yes
yes
yes
Psychologists
yes
no
yes
Pediatricians or family physicians
yes
yes
no
Neurologists
yes
yes
no

The family can start by talking with the child's pediatrician or their family doctor. Some pediatricians may do the assessment themselves, but more often they refer the family to an appropriate specialist they know and trust. In addition, state and local agencies that serve families and children, as well as some o...

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ADHD: What Treatments Are Available? - The Medication Debate

Disorders - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Written by iSyke .   

The Medication Debate

As useful as these drugs are, Ritalin and the other stimulants have sparked a great deal of controversy. Most doctors feel the potential side effects should be carefully weighed against the benefits before prescribing the drugs. While on these medications, some children may lose weight, have less appetite, and temporarily grow more slowly. Others may have problems falling asleep. Some doctors believe that stimulants may also make the symptoms of Tourette's syndrome worse, although recent research suggests this may not be true. Other doctors say if they carefully watch the child's height, weight, and overall development, the benefits of medication far outweigh the potential side effects. Side effects that do occur can often be handled by reducing the dosage.

It's natural for parents to be concerned about whether taking a medicine is in their child's best interests. Parents need to be clear about the benefits and potential risks of using these drugs. The child's pediatrician or psychiatrist can provide advice and answer questions.

Another debate is whether Ritalin and other stimulant drugs are prescribed unnecessarily for too many children. Remember that many things, including anxiety, depression , allergies, seizures, or problems with the home or school environment can make children seem overactive, impulsive, or inattentive. Critics argue that many children who do not have a true attention disorder are medicated as a way to control their disruptive behaviors.

Medication and Self-Esteem

When a child's schoolwork and behavior improve soon after starting medication, the child, parents, and teachers tend to applaud the drug for causing the sudden change. But these changes are actually the child's own strengths and natural abilities coming out from behind a cloud. Giving credit to the medication can make the child feel incompetent. The medication only makes these changes possible. The child must supply the effort and ability. To help children feel good about themselves, parents and teachers need to praise the child, not the drug.

It's also important to help children and teenagers feel comfortable about a medication they must take every day. They may feel that because they take medicine they are different from their classmates or that thereþs something seriously wrong with them. CH.A.D.D. (which stands for Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorders), a leading organization for people with attention disorders, suggests several ways that parents and teachers can help children view the medication in a positive way:

  • Compare the pills to eyeglasses, braces, and allergy medications used by other children in their class. Explain that their medicine is simply a tool to help them focus and pay attention.
  • Point out that they're lucky their problem can be helped. Encourage them to identi...

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Finding Help for Mental Health

Topics - Recovery
Written by California Department of Mental Health   

If you have any of the problems listed in How do you know when you need help?, you probably need mental health care. If you aren't sure, you should at least see your family doctor. Some problems are easily addressed by safe and effective medications that your doctor can prescribe.

If you feel you need someone with whom to discuss your problems - and you want more professional advice - then you need to see a mental health professional.

Under some insurance plans you may not be able to get services from a mental health professional without first going to your family doctor and getting a referral.

Choosing a Mental Health Professional

Choosing the right mental health professional is important. First become familiar with the different types of mental health providers in your community. The differences usually have to do with education and training.

Gather recommendations from friends, family, your medical doctor, your clergy, your local Mental Health Association, and professional organizations such as the local branch of the Psychological Association. Check the Yellow Pages in your phone book under the listings of Mental Health Services; licensed Clinical Social Workers; Marriage, Family, Child Counselors; Psychologists; and Psychiatrists. Also read this resource guide for other suggestions.

About Licensed Mental Health Professionals in California:

A Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) has completed a master's degree in social work with additional post-graduate work practicing under the supervision of a licensed therapist. Social Workers may provide psychotherapy, rehabilitation and case management services in hospitals, clinics and in private practice.

A Marriage, Family and Child Counselor (MFCC) has completed a master's degree in marriage, family and child counseling, psychology, social work (emphasis clinical social work) or counseling (emphasis marriage, family and child counseling), with additional post-graduate work practicing under the supervision of a licensed psychotherapist. MFCCs may provide psychotherapy and work in a variety of settings with individuals, couples, families and children.

A Psychiatrist is a medical doctor (M.D.) with special education and training in psychiatry. She/he can diagnose and treat the biological causes of mental disorders and prescribe medications and other therapies.

A Psychologist must complete a Ph.D. psychology. He/she can evaluate, diagnose and treat nervous, emotional and mental disorders as well as problems of everyday life and the psychological aspects of injury and disease. Most psychologists have specialized expertise in testing, psychological evaluation and psychotherapy.

Other mental health professionals you may encounter include psychiatric nurses, social workers, substance abuse counselors, psychiatric technicians, case managers and specialized therapist...

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