Dementia Care Myrtle Beach SC

Local resource for Dementia Care in Myrtle Beach. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to dementia, wandering, sun downing, safety, facility, Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss, as well as advice and content on how to deal with loved ones that may have dementia and/or Alzheimer’s and the expertise assistance you may need in dealing with the diseases.

SC Dept.of Health & Envir. Control-Waccamaw Public Health
(843) 448-8407
800 21st Avenue North
Myrtle Beach, SC
Services
Nursing homes, In home

Data Provided By:
Liberty Home Care, LLC
(843) 215-4140
1220 21st Avenue North, No:B
Myrtle Beach, SC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Live Long Well Care, LLC
(843) 903-8300
201 Brightwater Drive
Myrtle Beach, SC
Services
Nursing homes, In home

Data Provided By:
Total Care, Inc.
(803) 238-0887
1107 48th Avenue North
Myrtle Beach, SC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Winyah Home Health Care of the Grand Strand
(843) 839-2380
1705 North Oak Street
Myrtle Beach, SC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Incare Home Health & Hospice
(843) 293-4614
4685 Hwy 17S Bypass
Myrtle Beach, SC
Services
Hospice Care, In-home Care

Data Provided By:
American Red Cross
(843) 267-1758
2795 Pampas Drive
Myrtle Beach, SC
Services
Nursing homes, In home

Data Provided By:
Amedisys Home Health Of Myrtle Beach
(843) 916-0931
1705 North Oak Street #3
Myrtle Beach , SC
Ownership Type
Proprietary
Services
Nursing, Physical, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Medical Social, Home Health Aide

Liberty Home Care, LLC
(843) 215-4140
1220 21st Avenue North, No:B
Myrtle Beach, SC
Services
Nursing homes, In home

Data Provided By:
SC Dept.of Health & Envir. Control-Waccamaw Public Health
(843) 448-8407
800 21st Avenue North
Myrtle Beach, SC
Services
In-home Care

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Alzheimer's Disease - The Story of E.K.

Disorders - Alzheimer's Disease
Written by Ronald L. Hoffman, MD, CNS

The Story of E.K. 

The following is an actual case study of a patient with Alzheimer's Disease treated at our center. E.K. began developing memory lapses at the age of 73. She became increasingly forgetful, crying every morning, believing her dead parents were alive, began getting lost while going out alone, hiding her possessions, accusing her family of wanting to steal her things. Over a course of three years she developed profound memory loss and began to forget who her immediate family were. A neurologist rendered a diagnosis of Alzheimer's dementia. Blood tests performed by her neurologist revealed a normal SMAC and CBC. A serum B12 was 280, considered in the normal range. She was started on Tacrine, with minimal response.

When first seen at our center at the age of 76, EK. Could state her name but did not know where she was ofr the date. Physical exam was otherwise unremarkable, but she was uncooperative and suspicious. Homocysteine was found to be elevated at 16.8 (optimal 25).

The patient was given a series of B12 shots 3 times weekly for two weeks, then started on monthly injections. She was started on a gluten-free diet. She was placed on a combined regimen of nutritional supplements which were faithfully administered to her by her son who lived with her, as follows:

  • Multivitamin
  • Vit E 800 IU
  • Folate 5mg
  • B6 25mg
  • Vit C 4 gms
  • Inositol 12 gms
  • DHEA 25 mg
  • Thiamine 400mg
  • Alpha-lipoic acid 2000 mg
  • Acetyl-L-carnitine 1000mg
  • DHA (Docosohexaenoic acid) 1000 mg
  • Ginkgo biloba extract 320 mg
  • CoEnzyme Q10 200 mg
  • NADH 10mg
  • N-acetylcysteine 200mg
  • Phosphatidylserine 300 mg

The patient underwent gradual improvement in memory, mood and functional status. An early observation by her family was that she became relatively calmer and day/night reversal of her sleep pattern abated. She no longer could not be left alone, which had in the past prompted panic and calling out of windows that she needed help. Spells of anger, paranoia and obstinacy became less frequent. The patient's ability to name objects returned, and her ability to dress, bathe and eat with minimal assistance returned. After two years, her improvements were so significant that her neurologist noted the following on an insurance report:

"Patient seems to have recovered significant memory over the last 2 years from natural process/or the employment of vitamin supplementsin collaboration with family members. Improvement has been seen especially in areas of ADL (Activities of Daily Living), i.e. independence in self dressing, eating and light cooking. There is absolutely no issues [sic] about continence. There is no evidence of alteration of sleep-wake cycle, mood changes, agitation, wandering or other affective or personality disorders. She has reached a stable plateau in her neurological state with no evidence of progressive deteriora...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Mental Health Matters

Causes and Care of Dementia - Diagnosis is important

Disorders - Dementia
Written by Better Health Channel of Australia

Diagnosis is important

It is important to confirm a diagnosis. This will:

  • Rule out other conditions which can be mistaken for dementia - such as depression , stress,pain or infection.
  • Enable treatments to be discussed - there are treatments which can help some people.
  • Help planning for the future to start early, while the person affected can still actively participate.
  • Allow support to be arranged to assist both the person with dementia and their family.

A local doctor or specialist should conduct a full assessment. Cognitive Dementia and Memory Service (CDAMS) clinics are available throughout Victoria to assist in diagnosis. If the person will not go to a doctor or the doctor is unwilling to take your concerns seriously, seek advice on how to deal with this from the Alzheimer's Association Victoria.

Getting help early will make a difference

The earlier help is found, the better the family and person with the disease will be. It is important to:

  • Plan ahead - while the person can still legally sign documents, get an enduring power of attorney (to manage financial affairs) and enduring medical power of attorney (to manage medical decisions).
  • Get information - find out about dementia and what lies ahead, being informed gives people more sense of control.
  • Seek support - many people find it helpful to talk through what a diagnosis of dementia means and how they can make adjustments.
  • Practical help - help in the home, respite so carers can have a break, the person with dementia going out to clubs, day centres or outings with friends, all make a positive difference.

Support services

There is a wide range of community services which help both the person with dementia and their carers throughout the course of the disease. These include:

  • Dementia Helpline.
  • Support and information groups, for people in the early stages of dementia and their careers.
  • Career education and training programs.
  • Books, videos and other resources.
  • Counselling and practical advice, for individuals or family groups.
  • Carer support groups.
  • Telephone support programs.
  • Day centres.
  • Respite care, including in-home, out-of-home and flexible care (such as holidays). Home care and meals on wheels.
  • Hostels and nursing homes.

Things to remember

Dementia is a progressive decline in mental functioning. There are many causes of dementia - Alzheimer's disease is just one. While dementia is more common in older people, it is not a normal part of ageing.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Mental Health Matters