Grief Support Groups Columbia SC

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Mr. Jeffrey Rose
Families First Counseling Services
(803) 708-4700
1330 Richland Street
Columbia, SC
Credentials
Credentials: Ed.S. LMFT
Licensed in South Carolina
10 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Career/Employment Concerns, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Rela
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Military/Veterans, Offenders/Perpetrators, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Interracial Families/Couples, Grandparents
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided By:
Keith Reeves Barron
(803) 296-5879
Columbia, SC
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Disaster Counseling, Supervision
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Kitty Henderson
(803) 894-2124
Columbia, SC
Practice Areas
Career Development, Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, School, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified School Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Nicole Snell
(803) 251-0368
Columbia, SC
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Samer Touma
(803) 256-1737
Columbia, SC
Practice Areas
Career Development, Clinical Mental Health, Counselor Education, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Mr. Joseph Watterson
Joseph Watterson, LISW-CP
(803) 351-0146
3204 Millwood Avenue
Columbia, SC
Credentials
Credentials: LISW-CP
Licensed in South Carolina
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Trauma/PTSD, Gender Identity, Life Transitions, Anger Management,
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided By:
Claudia D Guignard
(803) 960-9361
Columbia, SC
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, School, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Tracy Oliver
(803) 318-1417
Columbia, SC
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Counselor Education, School, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Jim H. Hutcheson, Ph.D.
(803) 666-8147
Jim H. Hutcheson, Ph.D.1415 Richland St
Columbia, SC
Specialties
Depression, Loss or Grief, Spirituality
Qualification
School: USC
Year of Graduation: 1976
Years In Practice: 30+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$100 - $130
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepted Insurance Plans: APS Healthcare

Mark Stoll
(803) 434-2767
Columbia, SC
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Data Provided By:

How to Deal With Grief

Topics - Grief and Loss
Written by Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration   

What is grief?

Grief is the normal response of sorrow, emotion, and confusion that comes from losing someone or something important to you. It is a natural part of life. Grief is a typical reaction to death, divorce, job loss, a move away from family and friends, or loss of good health due to illness.

How does grief feel?

Just after a death or loss, you may feel empty and numb, as if you are in shock. You may notice physical changes such as trembling, nausea, trouble breathing, muscle weakness, dry mouth, or trouble sleeping and eating.

You may become angry—at a situation, a particular person, or just angry in general. Almost everyone in grief also experiences guilt. Guilt is often expressed as “I could have, I should have, and I wish I would have” statements.

People in grief may have strange dreams or nightmares, be absent-minded, withdraw socially, or lack the desire to return to work. While these feelings and behaviors are normal during grief, they will pass.

How long does grief last?

Grief lasts as long as it takes you to accept and learn to live with your loss. For some people, grief lasts a few months. For others, grieving may take years.

The length of time spent grieving is different for each person. There are many reasons for the differences, including personality, health, coping style, culture, family background, and life experiences. The time spent grieving also depends on your relationship with the person lost and how prepared you were for the loss.

How does grief differ from depression ?

Depression is more than a feeling of grief after losing someone or something you love. Clinical depression is a whole body disorder. It can take over the way you think and feel. Symptoms of depression include:

  • A sad, anxious, or “empty” mood that won’t go away
  • Loss of interest in what you used to enjoy
  • Low energy, fatigue, feeling “slowed down”
  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Loss of appetite, weight loss, or weight gain
  • Trouble concentrating, remembering, or making decisions
  • Feeling hopeless or gloomy
  • Feeling guilty, worthless, or helpless
  • Thoughts of death or suicide or a suicide attempt
  • Recurring aches and pains that don’t respond to treatment

How will I know when I’m done grieving?

Every person who experiences a death or other loss must complete a four-step grieving process:

  1. Accept the loss.
  2. Work through and feel the physical and emotional pain of grief.
  3. Adjust to living in a world without the person or item lost.
  4. Move on with life.

The grieving process is over only when a person completes the four steps.

What if these feelings won’t go away?

If you recently experienced a death or other loss, feelings of grief are part of a normal reaction. But if these feelings persist with no lifting mood, ask for help.

Contact:

Dep...

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