Psychiatrists High Point NC

Psychiatrists specialize in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of mental and emotional disorders such as anxiety, depression, developmental disabilities, psychosis, substance abuse and sexual dysfunction. See below for local psychiatrists in High Point that give access to mental status examinations and psychological tests, as well as advice and content on mental health.

Beverly N Jones MD
(336) 659-8817
3111 Maplewood Ave
Winston Salem, NC
Specialties
Psychiatry & Psychology

Data Provided By:
Brian Andrew Farah, MD
(336) 878-6226
320 Boulevard St
High Point, NC
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Raymond James Kennedy, MD
606 N Elm St
High Point, NC
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loyola Univ Of Chicago Stritch Sch Of Med, Maywood Il 60153
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided By:
Dr.Phyllis Taylor
320 Boulevard Street
High Point, NC
Gender
F
Speciality
Psychiatrist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.8, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Kim D Dansie, MD
(336) 889-6800
1836 Eastchester Dr Ste 100
High Point, NC
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided By:
Thomas Eugene Lauer, MD
(919) 889-4122
PO Box 5724
High Point, NC
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nc At Chapel Hill Sch Of Med, Chapel Hill Nc 27599
Graduation Year: 1977
Hospital
Hospital: High Point Regional Hospital, High Point, Nc
Group Practice: Medical Center Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Richard E Herrick, DO
320 Boulevard St
High Point, NC
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Lake Erie Coll Of Osteo Med, Erie, Pa 16509
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
Alexander Gordon Myers, MD
(336) 882-2232
131 W Parris Ave Ste 6
High Point, NC
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
Arthur Evans Kelley, MD
(336) 889-6800
1836 Eastchester Dr Ste 100
High Point, NC
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wv Univ Sch Of Med, Morgantown Wv 26506
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Doreen Louise Hughes, MD
(336) 889-6800
1836 Eastchester Dr Ste 100
High Point, NC
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Exercise and the Benefits to Mental Health

Topics - Healthy Living
Written by Craig Elliott   

Move over, medication. These days if you are suffering from depression and anxiety, your doctor could prescribe a daily walk or a yoga class. More and more, as we study the complex interactions between the physical and the psychological aspects of help, researchers are learning that physical exercise does more than get your body in shape.

According to a researcher at the Mayo Clinic, a nationally respected health center, "increasing physical activity is a positive and active strategy to help manage depression and anxiety."

Exercise can help your mood and keep you emotionally fit in many different ways. It is believed that regular physical exercise helps regulate the levels of neurotransmitters in the brain which regulate moods. Exercise also boosts the levels of endorphins, the feel-good chemicals in your brain, which can help lift sadness and depression , and reduces levels of the stress hormone, cortisol. All of these changes can reduce anxiety, worry, sadness and other emotions associated with depression , as well as relieving muscle stress and tension that leads to pain and can worsen depression .

Exercise has many benefits to a person suffering from depression . While exercise is not a substitute for medical treatment if you are suffering from depression , it can be a part of an overall strategy to help you recover and manage your symptoms, as well as to help prevent relapses. In addition to the physical effects of exercise, there are psychological benefits to exercise that can help improve your mood and lead to a quicker and longer lasting recovery from depression . These benefits of exercise for depression include:

Increased Confidence

Among the symptoms of depression are feelings of worthlessness and hopelessness. Physical exercise often leads to a sense of accomplishment that can increase good feelings about yourself when you need it most. Exercise can also help you feel better about your appearance and your self-worth. Meeting small goals is an excellent way to start boosting self-confidence with the feeling of accomplishment you take in completing challenges.

Distraction

Exercise can help distract you from dwelling on the problems in your life because your mind has to focus on other things. Dwelling on your symptoms can make them worse by interfering with your ability to manage and cope with them in a healthy way, making depression more severe and long-lasting. When you exercise, your mind is shifted away from thoughts of your depression and focused instead on pleasant thoughts - your surroundings, your physical abilities, even the music that you choose to listen to when you exercise.

Interactions and Socialization

People suffering from depression often withdraw socially and isolate themselves from others. The isolation can worsen the depression . Exercise is not always a guarantee of socialization, but exerci...

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Finding Help for Mental Health - Answering the Questions

Topics - Recovery
Written by California Department of Mental Health   

Before Making Your First Call You May Need to Answer these Questions

Do you need someone who has special expertise? For example, do you need a mental health professional who specializes in working with adolescents, with older people, or with people who have sexual problems or substance abuse problems, or people who come from different cultural backgrounds and/or have specific cultural needs?

Where must a mental health professional be located to be convenient for you?

How much will you be able to pay for therapy? What will your insurance cover, what types of mental health professionals and services will it reimburse?

What are the professional's qualifications, experience and training in the provision of culturally competent services?

The Mental Health Association in California suggests that if possible, you select three mental health professionals that you think might meet your needs. Call each of the three professionals and do a telephone interview.

Introduce yourself and explain that you are considering therapy. Ask them if they have the time to answer a few questions. If they don't, ask them to call you back at a time that is convenient for both of you.

A telephone interview will help you decide with whom you think you could work. After speaking with the mental health professionals, reflect on how they made you feel. Were they easy to talk to? Did they seem supportive? Did they answer your questions clearly? Were you comfortable speaking to them?

Questions You Might Ask in a Telephone Interview

  • What are the professional's qualifications, experience and training?
  • What kind of license does he/she have?
  • What is the fee? (If the fee is more than you can afford, can an adjustment be made, or is there a "sliding-scale" fee?)
  • Is there a charge for the initial consultation? If so, what is that charge?
  • Is insurance accepted and what plans are accepted? (If you are enrolled in a Health Maintenance Organization, you probably need a referral from your family's doctor or primary care physician).
  • If on Medi-Cal or Medicare, is it accepted?
  • What type of therapy is most often used? (Ask for an explanation of any new terms.)
  • What hours are available for appointments and how soon can you schedule an appointment?
  • What experience does the professional have in treating your type of problem?
  • What are the professional's qualifications. experience and training in the provision of culturally competent services?
  • During the first session you will want to learn the following information:
  • How long are therapy sessions?
  • How often will appointments be scheduled?
  • What will happen if you are late for a session or miss an appointment?
  • How can the therapist be reached in an emergency?
  • How much notice will you need to give to change an appointment?
  • How will insurance billings and co-payments be handled? When and how...

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Is Love a Mental Health Pathology?

Topics - Relationships
Written by Sam Vaknin   

The unpalatable truth is that falling in love is, in some ways, indistinguishable from a severe pathology. Behavior changes are reminiscent of psychosis and, biochemically speaking, passionate love closely imitates substance abuse. Appearing in the BBC series Body Hits on December 4, 2002 Dr. John Marsden, the head of the British National Addiction Center, said that love is addictive, akin to cocaine and speed. Sex is a "booby trap", intended to bind the partners long enough to bond.

Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), Andreas Bartels and Semir Zeki of University College in London showed that the same areas of the brain are active when abusing drugs and when in love. The prefrontal cortex - hyperactive in depressed patients - is inactive when besotted. How can this be reconciled with the low levels of serotonin that are the telltale sign of both depression and infatuation - is not known.

Other MRI studies, conducted in 2006-7 by Dr. Lucy Brown, a professor in the department of neurology and neuroscience at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, and her colleagues, revealed that the caudate and the ventral tegmental, brain areas involved in cravings (e.g., for food) and the secretion of dopamine, are lit up in subjects who view photos of their loved ones. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that affects pleasure and motivation. It causes a sensation akin to a substance-induced high.

On August 14, 2007, the New Scientist News Service gave the details of a study originally published in the Journal of Adolescent Health earlier that year. Serge Brand of the Psychiatric University Clinics in Basel, Switzerland, and his colleagues interviewed 113 teenagers (17-year old), 65 of whom reported having fallen in love recently.

The conclusion? The love-struck adolescents slept less, acted more compulsively more often, had "lots of ideas and creative energy", and were more likely to engage in risky behavior, such as reckless driving.

"'We were able to demonstrate that adolescents in early-stage intense romantic love did not differ from patients during a hypomanic stage,' say the researchers. This leads them to conclude that intense romantic love in teenagers is a 'psychopathologically prominent stage'".

But is it erotic lust or is it love that brings about these cerebral upheavals?

As distinct from love, lust is brought on by surges of sex hormones, such as testosterone and estrogen. These induce an indiscriminate scramble for physical gratification. In the brain, the hypothalamus (controls hunger, thirst, and other primordial drives) and the amygdala (the locus of arousal) become active. Attraction transpires once a more-or-less appropriate object is found (with the right body language and speed and tone of voice) and results in a panoply of sleep and eating disorders.

A recent study in the University of Chicago...

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