Schizophrenia Support Los Angeles CA

Local resource for Schizophrenia Support in Los Angeles. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to Schizophrenia, mental health, treatment for schizophrenia, anti-psychosis medications, general practitioner, as well as advice and content on schizophrenia information and mental professionals.

Stanislava Leslie
(310) 278-2900
132 S. Spalding
Beverly Hills, CA
Business
GP
Specialties
Psychiatry & Psychology, Family Practice
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Blue Cross, Tri care, KP, Aetna, Great-West
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: Yes

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Kaiser Permanente
Residency Training: Los Angeles
Medical School: Mayo Clinic, 2004
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Psychiatric Association
Awards: Best Student Film


Data Provided By:
Carolyn Stevens Mohr, MD
(213) 380-6320
2500 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles, CA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
Matthew Evan Bernstein, MD
(617) 855-2249
1414 S Grand Ave
Los Angeles, CA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19104
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided By:
Manuel L St Martin, MD
(213) 388-7311
3660 Wilshire Blvd Ste 922
Los Angeles, CA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny At Buffalo Sch Of Med & Biomedical Sci, Buffalo Ny 14214
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided By:
Michael T McGuire, MD
(310) 206-3420
200 Medical Plaza #465
Los Angeles, CA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Rochester Sch Of Med & Dentistry, Rochester Ny 14642
Graduation Year: 1960

Data Provided By:
George L Mallory, MD
(213) 731-1360
1828 S Western Ave
Los Angeles, CA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Howard Univ Coll Of Med, Washington Dc 20059
Graduation Year: 1953

Data Provided By:
James Byford Sparing, MD
(310) 208-1552
871 S Lucerne Blvd Apt 2
Los Angeles, CA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
Reynaldo De Los Angeles, MD
(308) 384-4739
2400 W 7th St
Los Angeles, CA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of The East, Ramon Magsaysay Mem Med Ctr, Quezon City
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided By:
Rodney Wm Burgoyne, MD
(213) 481-0068
1127 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles, CA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: George Washington Univ Sch Of Med & Hlth Sci, Washington Dc 20037
Graduation Year: 1957

Data Provided By:
Carl Hammer, MD
(610) 527-2324
Department 2842,
Los Angeles, CA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ De Lausanne, Fac De Med, Lausanne, Switzerland
Graduation Year: 1963

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Straight Talk About Schizophrenia

Disorders - Schizophrenia
Written by Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration   

Contrary to the common misconception, schizophrenia does not mean "split or multiple personality." And, although people with schizophrenia often are portrayed as violent on television and in movies, that is seldom the case. Schizophrenia is one of the most disabling and puzzling mental disorders. Just as "cancer" refers to numerous related illnesses, many researchers now consider schizophrenia to be a group of mental disorders rather than a single illness.

How is schizophrenia developed?

Generally, schizophrenia begins in late adolescence or early adulthood. Research indicates a genetic link to the development of schizophrenia. A child who has one parent with schizophrenia, for example, has about a 10 percent chance of developing the illness, compared with a one percent chance if neither parent has schizophrenia. Current research implicates abnormalities in both the brain's structure and biochemical activities. Researchers also tend to agree that environmental influences may be involved in the onset of schizophrenia.

More information about schizophrenia:

Symptoms:

Psychotic, or "positive," symptoms include delusions (bizarre thoughts that have no basis in reality); hallucinations (hearing voices, seeing nonexistent things, and experiencing sensations, such as burning, that have no source); and disordered thinking (apparent from a person's fragmented, disconnected and sometimes nonsensical speech). Other "negative" symptoms include social withdrawal, extreme apathy, diminished motivation, and blunted emotional expression.

Formal Diagnosis:

Active symptoms of the illness (such as a psychotic episode) for at least two weeks, with other symptoms lasting six months.

Treatment:

People who have schizophrenia often require medication to control the most troubling symptoms. Antipsychotic medications help bring biochemical imbalances closer to normal. The newer drugs may also be effective for symptoms such as social withdrawal, extreme apathy, and blunted emotional expression. More such drugs are being developed.

Recovery:

After these symptoms are controlled, psychotherapy and self-help groups can assist people who have schizophrenia learn to develop social skills, cope with stress, identify early warning signs of relapse, and prolong periods of remission. In addition, support groups and family therapy can give loved ones a better understanding of the illness and help them provide the compassion and support that play an important role in recovery. The good news is that more many of those who have schizophrenia can work, live in the community or with their families, and enjoy friends if they receive continuous, appropriate treatment. According to the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, treatment of schizophrenia is successful in 60 percent of patients.

Note: This fact sheet...

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What is Schizophrenia?

Disorders - Schizophrenia
Written by National Health & Medical Research Council of Australia   

Schizophrenia is a mental illness which affects one person in every hundred. Schizophrenia interferes with the mental functioning of a person and, in the long term, may cause changes to a person's personality.

First onset is usually in adolescence or early adulthood. It can develop in older people, but this is not nearly as common. Some people may experience only one or more brief episodes in their lives. For others, it may remain a recurrent or life-long condition. The onset of illness may be rapid, with acute symptoms developing over several weeks, or it may be slow, developing over months or even years.

During onset, the person often withdraws from others, gets depressed and anxious and develops extreme fears or obsessions.

What are the symptoms of schizophrenia?

Major symptoms of schizophrenia include:

  • Delusions - false beliefs of persecution, guilt or grandeur or being under outside control. People with schizophrenia may describe plots against them or think they have special powers and gifts. Sometimes they withdraw from people or hide to avoid imagined persecution.
  • Hallucinations - most commonly involving hearing voices. Other less common experiences can include seeing, feeling, tasting or smelling things which to the person are real but which are not actually there.
  • Thought disorder - where the speech may be difficult to follow; for example, jumping from one subject to another with no logical connection. Thoughts and speech may be jumbled and disjointed. The person may think someone is interfering with their mind.

Other symptoms of schizophrenia include:

  • Loss of drive - where often the ability to engage in everyday activities such as washing and cooking is lost. This lack of drive, initiative or motivation is part of the illness and is not laziness.
  • Blunted expression of emotions - where the ability to express emotion is greatly reduced and is often accompanied by a lack of response or an inappropriate response to external events such as happy or sad occasions.
  • Social withdrawal - this may be caused by a number of factors including the fear that someone is going to harm them, or a fear of interacting with others because of a loss of social skills.
  • Lack of insight or awareness of other conditions - because some experiences such as delusions and hallucinations are so real, it is common for people with schizophrenia to be unaware they are ill. For this and other reasons, such as medication side-effects, they may refuse to accept treatment which could be essential for their well-being.
  • Thinking difficulties - a person's concentration, memory, and ability to plan and organise may be affected, making it more difficult to reason, communicate, and complete daily tasks.

What causes schizophrenia?

No single cause has been identified, but several factors are believed to cont...

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What is Schizophrenia? - What treatment is available?

Disorders - Schizophrenia
Written by National Health & Medical Research Council of Australia   

What treatment is available?

The most effective treatment for schizophrenia involves medication, psychological counselling and help with managing its impact on everyday life.

The development of anti-psychosis medications has revolutionised the treatment of schizophrenia. Now, most people can leave hospital and live in the community. Not all people with schizophrenia have to go to hospital and care can be delivered in the community.

These medications work by correcting the chemical imbalance associated with the illness. New but well tested medications are emerging which promote a much more complete recovery with fewer side effects.

Schizophrenia is an illness, like many physical illnesses. For example, just as insulin is a lifeline for a person with diabetes, anti-psychosis medications are a lifeline for a person with schizophrenia. As with diabetes, some people will need to take medication indefinitely to prevent a relapse and keep symptoms under control.

Though there is no known cure for schizophrenia, regular contact with a doctor or psychiatrist and possibly a multidisciplinary team of mental health nurses, social workers, occupational therapists and psychologists can help a person with schizophrenia organise and do the important things in life.

Sometimes, specific therapies directed towards symptoms such as delusions may also be useful. Counselling and support can be helpful for problems with finances, accommodation, work, interaction with others and loneliness. Effective treatment can assist the person in leading a productive life.

Where to go for help

  • Your general practitioner.
  • Your school or university counsellor
  • Your community mental health centre.

For information on services, check the Community Help and Welfare Services and 24-hour emergency numbers in your local telephone directory.

www.health.gov.au/hsdd/mentalhe

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