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Stress Medication Des Moines IA

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Stress Medication. You will find informative articles about Stress Medication, including "Stress Medicine: Good Medicine for Bad Stress". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Des Moines, IA that can help answer your questions about Stress Medication.

Sandra F. Nett
(515) 277-1973
3931 Maquoketa
Des Moines, IA
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Iowa
Credentialed Since: 1975-04-03

Data Provided By:
Loren A Olson
(515) 279-6200
3900 Ingersoll Ave
Des Moines, IA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
James Lawrence Gallagher
(515) 222-1175
1000 73rd St
Windsor Heights, IA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Martin Jerome Fialkov
(515) 225-6861
1201 63rd St
Des Moines, IA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Timothy Olson
(515) 282-2319
1801 Hickman Rd
Des Moines, IA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Isabelle Perez-Conde
(515) 282-2319
1801 Hickman Rd
Des Moines, IA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Robert A. Straight
(515) 222-1175
1000 73rd St, Ste 5
Des Moines, IA
Services
Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Stress Management or Pain Management
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Southern Mississippi
Credentialed Since: 1992-01-02

Data Provided By:
Gertrude Doughten
(515) 282-2319
1801 Hickman Rd
Des Moines, IA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Kelli Green
(515) 282-2319
1801 Hickman Rd
Des Moines, IA
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided By:
Samuel L. Graham
(515) 222-1175
1000 73rd St. #5
Des Moines, IA
Services
Stress Management or Pain Management, Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Biofeedback, Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Duke University
Credentialed Since: 1988-10-07

Data Provided By:
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Stress Medicine: Good Medicine for Bad Stress

Topics - Stress
Written by Jan Oliver   

Most people recognize the difference between good stress and bad stress. Good stress helps you get up in the morning, go to work, be creative and put bread on the table. Good stress can sometimes be a challenge but it makes life interesting.

Bad stress, on the other hand, can make you not want to get up in the morning! It ruins jobs and relationships and can make you ill. It raises blood pressure, for instance, and that's just for a start. When stress starts to take over and ruin your life and health you need help. It's all very well to take about natural health but there are times when help starts at the doctor's office and leads to the pharmacy.

So when drugs are the only practical alternative for a stress crisis what kind of help is available?

Well, the days of your family doctor casually dispensing "mother's little helper" (valium) for any difficult patch are long gone. Nowadays doctors are closely scrutinized and they feel pressured to justify prescriptions for psychoactive drugs like valium, a common tranquilizer. (This is probably for the good although slightly hypocritical when the medical profession is only too eager to addict millions to anti-depressants and even children to powerful drugs like Ritalin. It partly depends on which drugs are currently in or out of favor.)

Despite many doctor's reluctance to prescribe them, benzodiazipines, a large class of drug which includes valium, Librium and the newer Xanax are still the most commonly prescribed drug for temporary and/or situational stress or anxiety. Despite the fact that they have been around a long time, they are still probably the most effective drugs available for generalized stress, at least for short term use.

In addition to general stress and anxiety relief, benzodiazepines are also used to relieve the symptoms of alcohol and narcotic withdrawal. If your stress problems are compounded by drugs or alcohol, benzodiazepines could be useful as they can help you cut your dependence on these substances while also relieving your stress.

There are many other types of drugs used to treat such conditions as anxiety, panic attack, social phobia and depression . These include the notorious Prozac and its relatives. These are probably not as suitable for the short-term treatment of stress as the benzodiazepines but that's for your doctor to determine.

Another interesting class of drugs, which could prove useful in certain cases, is beta-blockers. Atenolol and Inderal are well-known beta-blockers. These drugs are used primarily to treat high blood pressure but they also have the ability to calm and relieve anxiety and the racing heartbeat associated with these conditions. The psychoactive effect of beta-blockers is not at strong as that of the benzodiazepines but they can often be useful as a complementary treatment because severe stress is often associated with high blood pressure.

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Click here to read the rest of this article from Mental Health Matters