Substance Abuse Counselor Cary NC

Substance abuse counselors provide treatment for alcoholism, substance abuse and substance addiction. Counselors may facilitate group therapy and recommend drug therapy treatment. They may also guide drug addicts through the process of detoxification. See below for more information and to gain access to substance abuse counselors in Cary, NC who provide substance abuse counseling and other mental health services.

Mr. Amnon Fried
AKF Counseling
(919) 696-4891
4609 Western Boulevard
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW, CSAT, SAP
Licensed in North Carolina
19 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Grief/Loss, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder, Phobias, Sexual Disorders, Trauma/PTSD, Life Transitions, Sexuality I
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics)
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided By:
Ms. Brandi Kohr
Paradigm Counseling
(919) 601-9222
374 Raleigh Street
Holly Springs, NC
Credentials
Credentials: MSSA, QCSW, LISW-S, LCSW
Licensed in Ohio
7 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Depression, Forensic, Grief/Loss, Psychoses/Major Mental Illness, Self Abuse, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Sexual Orientation, Trauma/PTSD, Education/Pers
Populations Served
Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Military/Veterans, Offenders/Perpetrators
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided By:
Amnon Kenneth Fried
(252) 220-2234
AKF Counseling4509 Western Avenue
Raleigh, NC
Specialties
Depression, Relationship Issues, Sexual Issues & Sexual Addiction, Personality Disorders
Qualification
School: University of Maryland
Year of Graduation: 1984
Years In Practice: 15+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Age: Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$90 - $100
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes

Ms. Meigie Johnson
(919) 695-9050
871 Washington St.
Raleigh, NC
Specialties
Addiction, Depression
Qualification
School: University of NC at Chapel Hill
Year of Graduation: 1978
Years In Practice: 30+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No

John W ODonoghue
(919) 275-2068
3900 Barrett Drive
Raleigh, NC
Specialties
Addiction, Relationship Issues, Loss or Grief
Qualification
Years In Practice: 10 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$70 - $80
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: BlueCross and/or BlueShield

Ms. Tara Mirkar
Tara Mirkar, LCSW
(919) 455-7169
1405 Hillsborough Street
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
13 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Addictions/Substance, Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interper
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Military/Veterans, Offenders/Perpetrators, Alzheimer's, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients, Interracial Families/Couples
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided By:
Mrs. Elizabeth Detweiler
Human Service Associates
(919) 622-5776
839-C Wake Forest Business Park
Wake Forest, NC
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LCSW, LCAS
Licensed in North Carolina
19 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Child Abuse and Neglect, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Women's Issues
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided By:
Ms. Paige Armstrong
(919) 429-7620
Life Enrichment Resources3717 National Drive
Raleigh, NC
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Addictions, Money Issues, Codepende, Life Coaching, Bipolar Disorder
Qualification
School: Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU)
Year of Graduation: 2002
Years In Practice: 10 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Adults
Average Cost
$100 - $110
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes

Marilyn Bara
(919) 842-3064
871 Washington Street
Raleigh, NC
Specialties
Depression, Anxiety or Fears, Addiction
Qualification
School: UNC Chapel Hill School of Social Work
Year of Graduation: 1990
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Average Cost
$90 - $100
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepted Insurance Plans: BlueCross and/or BlueShield

Change for Living Counseling PLLC
(919) 807-1454
111 Windel Drive, Suite 213
Raleigh, NC
Specialties
Addictions or Substance Abuse,ADHD,Anxiety or Fears,Child or Adolescent Issues,Depression,Divorce,Gay Lesbian Issues,Parenting,Relationship Issues,Trauma and PTSD
Insurance
Yes

Data Provided By:

Drug Addiction Treatment Options

Disorders - Drug Addiction
Written by Gloria MacTaggart   

If you’re reading an article about drug addiction treatment, chances are that you, or someone you care about, are having a drug problem and you’re trying to find out how to fix it. The problem may be new, or may have been going on for years. Whichever is the case, it’s vital to use the right treatment method for your situation if you don’t want to still be dealing with the problem years from now.

What are your options?

Out-patient treatment: Often these programs are the least successful. A drug addict needs help getting through the pain of withdrawal. The symptoms can be so severe that addicts take the drug again to get relief, despite the fact that they really want to quit. There is also the problem of environment. Staying in the same environment where the person took drugs, with all the same problems, friends, habits, and so on, makes it very difficult for them to change.

Detox programs: While supervised detox programs can help an addict get off a drug safely and make sure their basic needs are taken care of during the process, a true addict will often need follow up in an addiction treatment center. The detox center helps them through the withdrawal process, but doesn’t not address the issues that caused them to take drugs in the first place. Many addicts make the mistake of thinking that once they’ve stopped taking the drug, they’ll be able to stay off it on their own. Generally, that’s not the case – although there are exceptions.

Narcotics Anonymous: Like Alcoholics Anonymous, this program has helped a lot of people. But many also drop out and relapse. And others find themselves going to meetings for the rest of their lives. Some go several times a day. But the reason they need the daily support, for years on end, is because the cause of their addiction was never successfully addressed – as it would be in a good addiction treatment center.

Drug replacement therapy: The most widely known replacement drug is methadone. People who formerly took heroin or other narcotics take methadone instead. They’re still addicted, but they’ve switched to methadone. Methadone is extremely difficult to kick, much worse than heroin, and people sometimes wind up on it for the rest of their lives. Methadone advocates often lead addicts to believe that the drugs they’ve taken have caused irreparable brain damage that will prevent them from ever being able to function without drugs of some sort or other. However, people are generally not tested to see if this actually is the case so they go on methadone for no good reason; they could have been actually cured of their addiction and the problems that set them off in that direction in the first place had they done a different type of treatment.

Short-term residential drug rehab: These programs usually last for 30 days; enough time for the person to get through withdrawal, but not m...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Mental Health Matters