Teen Depression Therapists Merrimack NH

Teen depression therapists provide treatment for adolescents suffering from depression. They provide treatment that may involve medication therapy, talk therapy, and family therapy. See below to find teen depression therapists in Merrimack, NH who provide depression treatment for teens, as well as advice and content on depression medication.

Ms. Marti Gould
(603) 546-5236
393 Daniel Webster Drive
Merrimack, NH
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in New Hampshire
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Physical Illness/Impairment, Self Abuse, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Sexual Orientation, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Life Transitions, Sexuality Issues, Women's Issues
Populations Served
Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adults (26-59)

Data Provided By:
Ms. Jessica Schwartz
Jessica Schwartz - Counseling Nashua NH
(978) 697-0276
120 Main Street Suite 103
Nashua, NH
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in New Hampshire
35 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Grief/Loss, Infertility, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder, Parenting Issues, Phobias, Pregnancy/Childbirth, Sexual Orien
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Caregivers, Grandparents, College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided By:
Dr. Mel Kimmel
(603) 889-0400
7-B Taggart Drive
Nashua, NH
Credentials
Credentials: Ph.D.
Licensed in New Hampshire
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Stress, Anger Management, Men's Issues
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided By:
Mr. Richard Cornell
Bedford Counseling Associates
(603) 623-1916
1228 Elm Street Suite 201
Manchester, NH
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in New Hampshire
34 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Depression
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25)

Data Provided By:
Mrs. Frances Mayer
Frances S. Mayer, LICSW
(603) 882-4410
39 Simon Street Unit 13
Nashua, NH
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in New Hampshire
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Grief/Loss, Pain Management, Physical Illness/Impairment, Stress, Life Transitions, Men's Issues, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Caregivers, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided By:
Ms. Maureen Guilfoyle
Maureen V. Guilfoyle LICSW
(603) 554-6198
5 Northern Blvd. Unit 1604
Amherst, NH
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in New Hampshire
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Self Abuse, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Sexual Orientation, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Caregivers, Step Families, College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided By:
Dr. Carl Hindy
Carl G. Hindy, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist
(603) 880-8773
120 Main Street
Nashua, NH
Credentials
Credentials: Ph.D.
Licensed in New Hampshire
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress, Life Transitions, Men's Issues, Women's Issues
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Caregivers, Step Families, Gifted, College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided By:
Ms. Penni Kaufman
Penni M. Kaufman, MSW
(603) 882-2115
120 Main St. Suite 105
Nashua, NH
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LICSW
Licensed in New Hampshire
25 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues, Obsessive/Compulsive Disor
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Step Families, Gifted
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided By:
James R. Graves
(978) 496-2050
70 Heather Court
Nashua, NH
Services
Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Sports Psychology, Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Psychological Assessment, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: American University
Credentialed Since: 1978-03-07

Data Provided By:
Ms. Becky Pine
Clarity Counseling & Coaching
(978) 448-8700
100 Hollis St.
Groton, MA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Massachusetts
20 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Education/Personal Development, Life Transitions, Women's Issues
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Helping Your Teen To Overcome Depression

Disorders - Depression
Written by Aurelia Williams   

Statistics on teenagers suffering from depression and other mental ailments are alarming. Various studies suggest that 1 in 4 teens suffer from some sort of mental illness. Teenage mental illness, to include depression , can have dire consequences. Teenage suicide is on the rise. It is the third leading cause of death in the age bracket of 15 to 24 years. Dealing with depression in teens is an important step in reducing these numbers in our society.

Many things can lead to depression . A teenager is just learning how to handle the pressures and emotions of an adult. Only 30% of teens suffering seek help. The others just suffer through and do their best to get through. Adults have difficulty dealing with many things, asking a teenager to deal with it on their own, is not be the best option.

Learning the signs of depression for our youth can be difficult. Depressed teenagers are often just seen as being a teen. Signs of irritability, fatigue, withdrawal and changes of eating and sleeping habits, are seen as normal signs of growing up and hormone surges. They are also signs of depression . Learning the difference in your teen's behavior may be key in getting them the help that they need.

Learning to talk to your teen may be your best investment in their mental health. Parents and adults in a teen's life struggle with this aspect. They often want to see the teen as still a child where the teen wants to be seen as an adult. Learning to bridge this gap and communicate efficiently may be a daunting task, but can be managed.

An adult should learn to offer support when conversing with a teenager. Let them know you are there for them. Ensure them that you are available to them at any time. Show them that you can listen without being judgmental. Don't try to talk them out of the way that they feel. Show them that you can understand and give them the help that they need to deal with how they are feeling.

Trust your own instincts. If you have a teenager that is showing signs of depression get them help. Trusting your own feelings and emotions may be what sets the teen on the road to better mental health. They may resist getting help at first. Be firm. Let them know you are there for them and willing to work with them, but insist that they find someone they can work with to help them through this difficult time in their life.

Often a teen will find it easier to speak with someone other than a parent. Consider a peer mentor for your teen. These are teens that are trained to work with others. They become a positive influence. Teen mentors can become a confidant and will be there for the teen that may be in trouble otherwise.

Teenage depression is a serious problem, but can be treated. Learn to recognize the symptoms and get help as soon as possible. Turn the teen in your life into a success story instead of a statistic.

Published At: www.Isn...

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Teen Depression: Warning Signs to Watch For

Disorders - Depression
Written by Stephanie Larkin   

If you have a teenager, then you should know how to watch out for teen depression , which can be easily discounted by parents as drama, and which can claim the life of your child. Many teenagers display behavior that their parents call "moody", and they dismiss it when their teens mention depression or when their behavior comes in line with depression , leading to a complete lack of the vital warning signs that could prevent many teen tragedies.

If you have a teenager, then it is vital that you know the signs of teen depression and what to do if your teenager is acting in a way that seems in line with this disease. It is important to note that depression is a disease and a serious condition. The teenage brain is one that is in a crucial stage of development, and while it is possible that your teen's moodiness is simply the exertion of his or her will to be independent, it could also be an important warning for you and your family to take positive action.

If your teenager is sleeping a lot, you could be looking at one of the many warning signs for depression . This is especially true if your teen is sleeping earlier in the evening and has trouble getting up in the morning, and if he or she still seems tired no matter how much sleep he or she gets. If this is accompanied by a loss or increase in appetite or other behavioral changes, talk to them to see if anything is amiss, and do not be afraid to consult a mental health professional on their behalf to see if you should take further action now or just wait and watch.

Insomnia is also a symptom of depression , expressing a duality on the sleep scale such as is normal with this type of mental illness. If your teen professes that they cannot sleep, depression might not be the cause, but neither should it be entirely ruled out. If your child suffers from insomnia and also is showing changes in behavior or mood, consult a professional.

In addition to sleeping, eating habits might also change rather dramatically when your teenager becomes depressed. If he or she is eating much more or much less than usual and also has displayed changes of mood, you could be looking at depression as a cause. Be sure that it is not merely a diet that your teen is trying out, or an attempt to bulk up for a sport team before you confront them or go for help.

Depression is characterized with a feeling of helplessness, hopelessness, and lethargy, and suicide is not necessarily the product of self-hate, but can also be seen by suffers as a means of escape from the pain and/or numbness that they are feeling. If your teen is feeling depressed, he or she may not cry at all, but may be prone to lashing out in anger for no apparent reason (something that most parents have witnessed, and which is not always a sign of depression ). They might feel the need to talk to their friends, but might also isolate themselves, ...

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Warning Signs of Adolescent Depression

Disorders - Depression
Written by Stephanie Larkin   

We are all concerned about the health of our children from the moment that they emerge into the world, but an overlooked aspect of their health could turn out to be one of the biggest factors.

A child's mental health, and, later in life, an adolescent's mental health, have huge effects on the way that our children and teens live. Problems like depression can affect the quality of life for your adolescent, and can even affect their physical health.

If you think that your adolescent may be depressed, look for the signs described in this article. If they exhibit several of the signs, consult with your pediatrician to see if they think that your teenager might be suffering from depression . Adolescent depression can cause symptoms such as:

Irregular sleep - Sometimes teenagers are just on a different sleep schedule than their parents. It is perfectly normal for a teen to stay up late at night and to want to sleep in well into the next day. This is not an attitude problem, but a rewiring of their brains that drives them to these "abnormal" hours. They will return to "normal" as time goes on. What is not normal is a teen that sleeps all the time, going to bed early, sleeping late, and retiring for naps. It is also not normal for an adolescent to suffer from insomnia . While these could be symptoms of other problems, they can also be signs of depression .

Lack of energy - Despite all that extra sleep, does your adolescent still seem fatigued or tired much of the time? Low energy and lots of sleep could be signs of a problem with the thyroid, it could be something else entirely, or it could be an example of a symptom of depression .

Loss of interest - It might be hard to tell if your child has become disinterested in things that used to interest them if they are not open with you, but it pays to pay close attention. If your adolescent is no longer interested in things like keeping in contact with their friends or in playing the latest video games, whatever he or she used to be excited about, then it could be cause for concern.

Change of appetite - Is your always-hungry teen suddenly disinterested in food? Is your teenager suddenly and uncharacteristically eating all the time (particularly "comfort foods" or sweets)? These could both be signs of depression , and should be watched carefully. They could also indicate problems like an eating disorder, and so should be taken seriously no matter what the circumstances.

Irritability - While it can be hard to tell if your teen is irritable in general or just snappy with you as an authority figure, it is good to note that excessive irritability may be a sign of depression .

A bleak outlook - If your child is suddenly talking in the negative or talking about suicide, chalking it up to "mood swings" can be a mistake that can have deadly consequences. This may be o...

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